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Friday, 10 October 2014

Is Museveni afraid of the ICC because he knows that he is a potential candidate for the ICC?? Museveni blasts ICC over Kenyatta trial: Museveni tells Africa to quit ICC

President Museveni used the 52nd Independence day celebrations to urge African countries to review their membership of the International Criminal Court (ICC), which he accuses of being biased and an “instrument of post-colonial hegemony”.

Museveni’s problem with the ICC is its insistence on prosecuting Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta for his alleged role in the post-2007 election violence that killed more than 1,000 people.

“The problems that occurred in Kenya in 2007 and those that happened in other African countries are, first and foremost, ideological. ICC to handle them as just legal matters is the highest level of shallowness,” Museveni said.
A former proponent of the court, Museveni has recently turned into its harshest critic, once calling it a group of “arrogant actors”.

Because European powers want to play the “big boy” role over Africa, Museveni says, it is the reason why a resolution by the African Union (AU) cushioning African presidents from being summoned by the ICC was ignored. The AU assembly of heads of state that sat in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa last year passed the resolution that was also tabled before the UN Security Council.

Because Africa has no permanent members at the Security Council, Museveni believes, it did not “see much merit in the collective wisdom of African leaders,” leading to the court’s summoning of Kenyatta.
“The pushers of the hegemonic agenda have been misusing the ICC, an institution we initially supported,” Museveni said.


“My view is that, at the next summit, African countries should review their membership of the ICC treaty. The ICC is turning out not to be the value-addition product that we had expected it to be. It is instead, a biased instrument of post-colonial hegemony,” Museveni added.

On Wednesday, Kenyatta appeared before the court sitting at The Hague, Netherlands, during its status conference. He returned home on Thursday morning and was received by massive crowds. He had been expected to join his colleagues Paul Kagame (Rwanda) Jakaya Kikwete (Tanzania) and Salva Kiir (South Sudan) at the Independence Day celebrations.

Conflicts

Museveni also blamed Western powers for the conflicts in North Africa and the Middle East.
“These global players are always in cahoots with incapable puppets. It is that permutation that is, mainly, responsible for these tragedies of human haemorrhage, destruction of social and economic capital and loss of development time in those unfortunate lands,” Museveni said.
He paid tribute to the late Tanzanian president Julius Nyerere.

“The strong capacity you see here of the UPDF, police and our party, the NRM, were strongly influenced by 28 cadres who Nyerere helped me to train in Mozambique,” Museveni said.
He named Kagame as one of the beneficiaries of Nyerere’s influence on the 28 cadres. Although some of the cadres abandoned him and turned into “bandits”, Museveni said, their impact had spread to also cause change in South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Twenty-two people were awarded medals, some of which were supposed to have been received in 2012. These included Emmanuel Cardinal Wamala, and the only surviving delegates to the Lancaster conference that negotiated Uganda’s independence: Mbonye Byombi and Mbabi Katana.

Among the notable absentees was NRM Secretary General Amama Mbabazi, who was recently sacked as prime minister. Mbabazi, The Observer learnt, chose to mark the day in his home district of Kanungu.
One of the attention-grabbing individuals was a greying old woman who sauntered to where Museveni was seated and engaged the president in some conversation. Museveni left his seat to talk to the old woman, before handing her an envelope. The woman then walked away, visibly happy on this anniversary of Uganda’s independence

Museveni attack on ICC dominates independence celebrations



President Museveni (with hat) poses for a photo with some of the beneficiaries of the Jubilee medals at Uganda’s 52nd independence celebrations at Kololo Independence Grounds in Kampala yesterday. 
By RICHARD WANAMBWA

Posted  Friday, October 10  2014 at  01:00
In Summary
Displeased. The President says African countries should review their membership of the ICC treaty after summoning Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta over the country’s 2007 election violence.

KOLOLO.
President Museveni yesterday attacked the International Criminal Court (ICC) for summoning Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta over a case related to election violence that rocked the country in 2007.
Mr Museveni said by summoning Mr Kenyatta, a sitting president, the ICC had despised an African Union resolution and exposed itself as being used to push “the hegmonistic post-colonial agenda targeting African leaders.”

“My view is that, at the next summit, African countries should review their membership of the ICC treaty. The ICC is turning out not be the value addition product that we had expected it to be. It is instead a biased instrument of post-colonial hegemony,” the President said.
Mr Museveni, who was addressing the nation at Uganda’s 52nd independence celebrations at Kololo, also faulted the ICC for calling the case “status conference” on the eve of the East African Community infrastructure summit at Munyonyo.
Attack on ICC
“The pushers of the hegmonistic agenda have been misusing the ICC, an institution we initially supported. The African Union Assembly of Heads of State resolved that no African sitting President should be summoned by that court. This resolution was taken to the (United Nations) Security Council where there is no permanent member from Africa,” Mr Museveni said.

“That group did not see much merit in the collective wisdom of the African leaders; and the court summoned President Kenyatta on the eve of our summit here. Was the aim of ICC to disrupt our summit? Too bad for them. Our summit went on yesterday (Wednesday).”
The President added that the problems of electoral violence in Kenya in 2007 and those that erupt in other African countries are ideological and “ICC to handle them as just legal matters is the height level of shallowness.”

President Kenyatta appeared at the ICC on Wednesday and the court adjourned his case indefinitely. Prior to flying out, he had handed over power to his deputy, Mr William Ruto, so that he appears at the ICC in his individual capacity. On return, before he regained his presidential status, he was welcomed by a huge crowd.
Presidents present

The Kololo celebrations were attended by presidents Paul Kagame (Rwanda), Salva Kiir (South Sudan), and Jakawa Kikwete of Tanzania. There were representatives from Kenya, Burundi and Ethiopia. Mr Kikwete, who spoke on behalf of other guests, said Uganda has made progress. “The people of Uganda live a better life than it was 30-40 years ago, something President Museveni and NRM fought hard for.”
There was a parade of the armed forces, and procession of various institutions that showcased their goods and services.

Mr Museveni reiterated his threat that the army and police will quash anybody who plans to disrupt peace. He also appealed to the population to engage in large scale commercial farming to eradicate poverty.

He also warned against eating monkeys and bats that can transmit the deadly Ebola and Marburg diseases.
Kampala Archbishop Emeritus Emmanuel Cardinal Wamala and philanthropist Mother Mary Kevin Kearney, who founded Nsambya Hospital, were among the recipients of the golden jubilee medals.

Museveni blasts ICC over Kenyatta trial
 
 

Publish Date: Oct 09, 2014
Museveni blasts ICC over Kenyatta trial
President Yoweri Museveni delivering his speach during the 52nd Independence cerebrations at Kololo Independence grounds. PHOTO/ Enock Kakande
By Moses Walubiri & David Lumu

President Yoweri Museveni has taken strong exception to the raging trial by the International Criminal Court (ICC) of Kenyan President, Uhuru Kenyatta, describing The Hague based court as “a biased instrument of post-colonial hegemony.”

Museveni avers that Africa should urgently reconsider its engagement with ICC on account of its humiliating treatment of the continent.

Kenyatta, together with his deputy, William Ruto are facing trial for crimes against humanity emanating from the bloody fallout from the  highly charged 2007 presidential polls in Kenya that claimed the lives of over 1000 people.

Kenyatta contends that the charges against him are politically motivated and has since received support from the African Union which (AU) wants the case dropped or shelved until he is out of office.

On Thursday, Kenyatta became the first sitting Head of State to appear before the ICC in what promises to be a truly landmark case.

“The problems that occurred in Kenya in 2007 and that happen in other African countries are, first and foremost, ideological. For ICC to handle them as just legal matters is the epitome of shallowness,” Museveni said during national celebrations at Kololo to mark 52 years of Uganda’s independence.

Museveni, who had earlier introduced the three Heads of States who graced the fete– Jakaya Kikwete, Paul Kagame and Salva Kir – of Tanzania, Rwanda and South Sudan respectively as “our brothers”, attributed Kenyatta’s absence to “big boys” summoning him.

“The pushers of the hegemonic agenda have been misusing the ICC, an institution we initially supported,” Museveni added.
Museveni took exception to a decision by the United Nations not to consider a request by African Union for the ICC to cease arraigning sitting African Heads of State.

 “That group did not see much merit in the collective wisdom of the Africa leaders,” Museveni said to prolonged murmurs.

The UN Security Council is the top decision making organ at the UN comprising of USA, Russia, China, France and Britain.
The ICC has received criticism over its perceived selective application of justice on account of only pursuing cases involving Africans.

Some of these include Sudan President, Omar Bashir, former DRC Vice President, Pierre Bemba, Liberia’s former President, Charles Taylor and former Congolese war lords – Bosco Ntaganda and Thomas Lubanga.

However, citizens of countries like Russia, China, USA and Israel cannot be prosecuted by the ICC because these states have not ratified the Rome Statute that created the court.

Kenyatta who travelled business four days ago is back in Kenya.

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