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Monday, 17 November 2014

Enough is Enough!! Kenya government confronts Kenya’s rotten prosperity gospel Movement : Kenya government Bans New Churches Amid 'Miracle-Faking Spree: Kenya Envengelical leaders accuse Attorney General Githu Muigai of persecuting Church





Kenya Bans New Churches Amid 'Miracle-Faking Spree' 
KTN Kenya (YouTube screenshot)

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Kenyan Pastor Pays Prostitutes To Pose As Sick People In Miracle Scam

http://watchmanafrica.blogspot.com/2012/07/kenyan-pastor-pays-prostitutes-to-pose.html  

Kenya Festival 2009: A Promotion and Protection of Sound Doctrine or Apostasy, Political Christianity, Ecumenism, Greed and Mammon Worship

http://watchmanafrica.blogspot.com/2009/09/kenya-festival-2009-promotion-and.html

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http://watchmanafrica.blogspot.com/2009/07/day-kenya-rose-against-rotten.html  

A CURSED GENERATION OF PASTORS: AFRICA'S RAPID EMBRACE OF THE ROTTEN PROSPERITY PENTECOSTALISM PROVOKES CONCERN




Kenya Bans New Churches Amid 'Miracle-Faking Spree'


After TV exposé, attorney general seeks ways to reign in fake pastors.
Kenya Bans New Churches Amid 'Miracle-Faking Spree' 
KTN Kenya (YouTube screenshot)
This TV expose of Victor Kanyari led Kenya to ban new churches.
Prompted by news coverage of alleged illegal activity by pastors promising miracles, Kenya’s attorney general has banned new religious organizations from registering as the East African nation moves to enforce stricter regulations on churches, mosques, and temples.

The registration ban will be in place indefinitely, and existing religious organizations must file details of their registration status and financial returns, according to the Daily Nation. Meanwhile, Kenyan attorney general Githu Muigai will meet today with religious leaders from organizations including the Kenya Episcopal Conference, the National Council of Churches of Kenya, the Hindu Council of Kenya, the Supreme Council of Kenya Muslims, and the Inter-Religious Council of Kenya to discuss what new regulations might look like, according to First Digital TV.

Mark Kariuki, chairman of the Evangelical Alliance of Kenya, said in advance of Friday's meeting that Muigai’s move to stop church registration and regulate churches amounted to persecution, according to Kenya's Standard.

“We call on all Christians to support us and stand with us,” he said. “When it comes to matters of faith, people are willing to die for the faith and we will stand firm with the church.”

The government response came after TV station KTN's Jicho Pevu and Inside Story broadcast a "Prayer Predators" exposé of preacher Victor Kanyari, whom the station claimed had been making money from his followers by asking them for advance payment for prayers and miracles [see video below]. Kanyari, who preaches at Salvation Healing Ministry, continued holding services but hired security to screen out visiting journalists, according to the Standard.

Kanyari admitted he coached members of his church to give false testimonies, but said many people had been “healed and blessed in many ways” by his ministry. He will be investigated for obtaining money by false pretenses, according to Kenya's director of public prosecutions.

The government will also attempt to amend the Societies Act, an act “for the registration and control of societies” that regulates Kenyan clubs and other organizations, to protect people “seeking religious nourishment,” according to allAfrica.com. Muigai said he wants increased accountability to curb pastors’ “miracle-faking spree.” His proposals will regulate and manage religious communities, including churches, mosques, and temples, in an attempt to gain transparency and accountability, according to People Daily.
In Kanyari’s case, police plan to first interview worshippers who claim they were conned. Meanwhile, the Kenyan Daily Post released a list of pastors who have reportedly “perfected the art of stealing in the name of the Lord.”

This is not Kenya’s first attempt to regulate rogue preachers: In March 2013, CT reported on another controversial proposal to weed out “fake pastors” in Kenya, where “tales of dubious healings and questionable behavior” are common.

And in 2012, the Standard reported how evangelical groups in Kenya, including the Evangelical Alliance of Kenya, banded together in an attempt to self-regulate against pastoral deception and criminal activity, which were “critically hurting the image of the Church.”

CT has previously reported on faith in Kenya, including uproar over proposed pay-to-preach laws, pastoral involvement in a campaign to circumcise millions of African men, and a wave of violence over the summer that targeted Christians.



Attorney-General Muigai suspends registration of new religious organisations

Tuesday, November 11, 2014
Attorney-General Githu Muigai during a meeting with journalists at a Nairobi hotel on August 19, 2014. PHOTO | BILLY MUTAI
Attorney-General Githu Muigai during a meeting with journalists at a Nairobi hotel on August 19, 2014. The government has now suspended the registration of new religious organisations indefinitely. PHOTO | BILLY MUTAI |  NATION MEDIA GROUP

 By MAZERA NDURYA

The government has now suspended the registration of new religious organisations indefinitely as it moves to streamline the regulation of such entities.
The suspension takes effect on Tuesday, November 11.
In a statement, Attorney-General Prof Githu Muigai also directed existing religious organisations to file details of their current status and financial returns with the Registrar of Societies.
That information, the AG noted, must include the full name of the organisation, a registration number, the date of registration and the full particulars of office bearers, copies of identification cards, passport-size photos and a copy of the Kenya Revenue Authority’s personal identification number (PIN).
“The State Law Office has also invited various religious organisations, (the) parliamentary Committee on Justice and Legal Affairs and the Commission on the Implementation of the Constitution for a meeting to be held on Friday, November 14, to discuss proposed regulations on religious organisations operating in Kenya,” said the AG.
RESTORE PUBLIC CONFIDENCE
He said the move to regulate religious organisations was prompted by recent media reports on the alleged illicit activities of certain religious institutions and the need for remedial actions in order to restore public confidence.
Among those invited to the Friday meeting are Dr Francis Kuria of the Inter-Religious Council of Kenya; Fr Vincent Wambugu of the Kenya Episcopal Conference (KEC); and Rev Peter Karanja Mwangi, the general-secretary of the National Council of Churches of Kenya (NCCK).
Others are Vanraj Sarvaiya of the Hindu Council of Kenya (HCK) and Prof Abdul Gafar Al-Busaidy of the Supreme Council of Kenya Muslims (Supkem).
Last Sunday, the government said it was working on a model for registering religious organisation following an exposé on preacher Victor Kanyari that was broadcast on TV channel KTN.
A statement from State House said that Prof Muigai had already proposed to the government “a framework for registration and management of religious communities.”
According to the proposal, only churches, mosques and temples that reflect transparency, accountability and spirituality will be registered.
The investigative series had last week exposed malpractices by Mr Kanyari’s Salvation Healing Ministry church that included coached testimonies, fake healings and outright extortions.
ORDERED INVESTIGATIONS
Director of Public Prosecutions Keriako Tobiko on Thursday last week ordered an investigation of the activities of the preacher.
Mr Tobiko, in a posting on his official Twitter account, said the pastor would be investigated for allegedly obtaining money by false pretence and cheating.
Mr Kanyari admitted that he had coached some members of his church to give false testimonies and make fake phone calls on his radio programmes to dupe listeners.
“I cannot say that I do not coach people to give testimonies,” said the preacher, who was the subject of the exposé that has sparked outrage.
However, he said there were many people who had been “healed and blessed in many ways on a daily basis” through his ministry.
The NCCK has come out in support of proposals to start registering churches and mosques to stop them from being abused for personal gain.
“Religious leaders are public officers and they should operate within the law and those who flout this should be faced with a legal mechanism to check their operations,” said Rev Karanja of the NCCK.


Clergy accuses Attorney General Githu Muigai of persecuting Church

By Sophiah Muthoni 
Updated Friday, November 14th 2014 at 00:00 GMT +3

The Chairman of Evangelical Alliance Bishop Mark Kariuki (centre), with other pastors addressing the press at AIC Milimani Church Nairobi where they opposed controlling of Churches by the Government .13/11/14. PICTURE BY GOVEDI ASUTSA .
 The Chairman of Evangelical Alliance Bishop Mark Kariuki (centre), with other pastors addressing the press at AIC Milimani Church Nairobi where they opposed controlling of Churches by the Government  PHOTO BY: GOVEDI ASUTSA/STANDARD]
Kenya: Some church leaders have opposed plans by the Government to tighten regulations on registration of religious organisations.

Led by Evangelical Alliance of Kenya Chairman Bishop Mark Kariuki, they alleged that the move by the Attorney General Githu Muigai to stop registration of new churches and his proposal to introduce regulations amounted to persecuting the church.

They were addressing journalists at AIC Milimani Church where they met ahead of their meeting with the AG on Friday.

“We see this as persecution of the Church and we call on all Christians to support us and stand with us. When it comes to matters of faith, people are willing to die for the faith and we will stand firm with the church,” said Kariuki (pictured).

The leaders, however, affirmed that they were ready for the meeting with the AG, which will discuss proposed regulations on local religious organisations.
The move by the AG after KTN exposed how a Nairobi pastor, Victor Kanyari, has been fleecing his congregation by faking miracles.

 
The AG has directed existing religious organisations to file details on their current status and financial returns with the Registrar of Societies.

Among the details that the organisations are required furnish the registrar with are a copy of Kenya Revenue Authority’s personal identification number, full name of the organisation, a registration number, date of registration, details of office bearers, copies of their identification cards and their passport size photographs.
During the press briefing, Kariuki, argued that there is no need for the church to be punished for the since of one person.

Last week the Director of Public Prosecution (DPP) Keriako Tobiko on his official twitter page said Pastor Kanyari of the Salvation Healing Ministry Church should be investigated over allegations obtaining money by false pretences.

He also urged KTN to help investigators in tracing the victims who were interviewed for the story.


Churches, mosques face tough new rules after the Kanyari ‘seed’ scandal

'Prophet' Victor Kanyari during an interview in the parking lot of a popular city mall on November 4, 2014. Government Sunday said it is planning to start registering churches and mosques to stop them from being abused for either personal gain or to cause insecurity. PHOTO | DIANA NGILA |
"Prophet" Victor Kanyari during an interview in the parking lot of a popular city mall on November 4, 2014. The government on Sunday said it is planning to start registering churches and mosques to stop them from being abused for either personal gain or to cause insecurity. PHOTO | DIANA NGILA |   NATION MEDIA GROUP
By BERNARD NAMUNANE
By JAMES KARIUKI
The covernment on Sunday said it is planning to start registering churches and mosques to stop them from being abused for either personal gain or to cause insecurity.
Good intentions notwithstanding, religious groups will be uncomfortable with such a decision because it suggests that the government wants to control religion.
On Sunday, State House said Attorney-General Githu Muigai had drafted regulations on registering and managing churches, mosques and temples.
The regulations will be handed over to a task force whose members will be named soon and whose responsibility will be to fine-tune them before they become law.
This means churches, mosques and temples will be required to meet specific conditions and abide by the proposed amendments to the Societies Act before they can be allowed to operate.
However, religious leaders yesterday warned the government against the decision, saying that the Constitution guarantees them freedom of worship.
KANYARI EXPOSE
“The #AG has proposed to the Govt (government) a framework for registration & management of religious communities,” the Presidential Strategic Communications Unit said through its twitter handle — PSCU_Digital.
The move comes in the wake of an expose about the exploits of Salvation and Healing Ministry preacher Victor Kanyari, who has been making money from his followers through fake miracles. According to the documentary, he used to ask his congregation to send Sh310 through mobile money transfer before they could receive prayers and miracles.
The government’s response also comes against the backdrop of increased radicalisation of youths in mosques, with the government warning that mosques would not be allowed to be used as breeding grounds for terrorists.
Responding to questions raised about Mr Kanyari, State House said Prof Muigai had submitted a list of requirements and conditions that religious organisations would meet before being cleared to operate.
It said all religious organisations would be required to prove their “transparency, accountability and spirituality” in order to be registered.

“#AG says churches, mosques and temples that reflects transparency, accountability and spirituality will be registered,” it said.
'WORK IN PROGRESS'
“A task force to advice on the amendment/overhaul of the societies act shall be announced soon,” the statement said.
Contacted Sunday, Prof Muigai said that the draft regulations were a “work in progress” and were an outcome of the public demand for government to do more to protect them from religious leaders whose credibility was in question.
“The idea of religious freedom is fundamental. However, it cannot be left without oversight. People want the government to do more,” he said.
Under the current regime, churches and mosques are registered as charities under the Societies Act. However, the advent of evangelical churches appears to have thrown a challenge to the government by making it impossible to draw a line between the spiritual side of the churches and the commercial aspect that accompanies them.
At the Coast, the infiltration of mosques by groups bent on radicalising the youth has undermined security and destroyed the local economy.
Interfering
GOVERNMENT WARNED
But the Evangelical Churches Alliance chairman, Bishop Mark Kariuki, former National Council of Church of Kenya (NCCK) boss Mutava Musyimi and Kenya Muslim National Advisory Council chairman Sheikh Juma Ngao warned against government regulation of religion.
Bishop Kariuki, who spoke by phone, accused the government of interfering with freedom of worship even as he accused the Registrar of Societies of approving new churches without due diligence.
He said it was wrong to use pastor Kanyari as the reason to come down hard on churches that were working within the provisions of the law.
“One rotten tomato does not mean all tomatoes are rotten. If they go there, we will have a problem,” he said.
Sheikh Ngao warned that the planned regulation should not be used by the government to keep people from places of worship.
However, he condemned religious leaders who were using the Bible to extort money from their flock.

DPP orders police to investigate preacher Victor Kanyari

Thursday, November 6, 2014
'Prophet' Victor Kanyari during an interview in the parking lot of a city mall on November 4, 2014.
'Prophet' Victor Kanyari during an interview in the parking lot of a city mall on November 4, 2014. PHOTO | DIANA NGILA |   NATION MEDIA GROUP
By EVELYNE MUSAMBI
 
Director of Public Prosecutions Keriako Tobiko on Thursday ordered an investigation of embattled preacher Victor Kanyari.
Mr Tobiko, in a posting on his official Twitter account, said the pastor would be investigated for allegedly obtaining money by false pretence and cheating.
“DPP orders Pst. Kanyari be probed 4 crimes of obtaining by false pretences; cheating, etc. after expose' by KTN #JichoPevu,” read the tweet.
The preacher has been trending on Twitter since Sunday after the investigative series exposed malpractices in his Salvation Healing Ministry church.
Mr Kanyari was captured on tape coaching people to offer false testimonies and using potassium permanganate to create illusions of miracles being performed on devotees.
NO APOLOGIES
In an interview with the Nation on Tuesday, the preacher made no apologies and admitted to coaching his staff to give testimonies.
He also admitted that it was wrong to have faked phone calls during a recording of a radio show, stating: “It was not a live recording. We did that to encourage people to call so that they can receive their prayer. I am just a human being who makes mistakes like any other person.”
Mr Kanyari is the son of disgraced self-proclaimed prophetess Lucy Nduta, who was jailed for two years for fraud after she was exposed by the Sunday Nation for faking healings.
He insisted that God speaks to him “normally” as human beings would converse and his gift of prophesy is as “real” as the “miracles” that he performs.