Google+ Followers

Saturday, 22 February 2014

Uganda false prophet and cult reader Prophet Wilson Bushara, of World Message Last Warning Church, who proclaimed end of world in 1999, dies

Prophet William Bushara


Prophet who proclaimed end of world in 2000, dies

http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/Prophet-who-proclaimed-end-of-world-in-2000--dies/-/688334/2216154/-/olfmt4/-/index.html


By Nelson Bwire

Posted  Friday, February 21  2014 at  11:49
In Summary

Bushara attracted media attention when he proclaimed that the World would end on June 30, 1999 and convinced his followers to sell off their property and buy places in heaven


The prophet who prophesied that the world was ending in 2000 has died. Prophet Wilson Bushara, of World Message Last Warning Church, based in Nakaseke district died this morning (Friday).
Bushara attracted media attention when he proclaimed that the World would end on June 30, 1999 and convinced his followers to sell off their property and buy places in heaven.
He then went into hiding after the Police stormed his camp at Bukoto, Nakaseke county, Luweero district, on September 18, 1999. Bushara was known to have a connection with another cult leader, Joseph Kibwetere who murdered at least 1,000 of his followers on March 17th 1999.
He however, denied any connection with Joseph Kibwetere despite pictorial evidence showing the two of them together. Bushera with a number of followers disguised as milk vendors and hotel waitresses then fled to Busia district on hearing that the police was after them. He had nine wives at the time, one of them a 15 year old teenager.
10 years later (2011), Bushara again prophesied that the world was ending soon, and he started issuing invitation cards to his followers to an event he called the "last Supper". The cards were sold at 23,000shs each.
Bushara told his followers that signs like lightning and earthquakes, during that year signified that the world was about to come to an end and further assured them that only those with cards would go to heaven alive, while those with out, would have to rot in hell.
However, Bushara was this time careful not to commit any date as to when the world would end.
Bushara has died aged 53 years, with a number of charges to his back. He was in May charged with defilement and conducting an unlawful assembly, before being sent to Luzira prison and later released.

Other cult readers in Uganda 



 

Rev.Fr. Kibwetere

A.K.A.: "The Prophet"

Classification: Mass murderer
Characteristics: Suicidal Cult leader (The Movement for the Restoration of the Ten Commandments of God)
Number of victims: 1000 +
Date of murders: March 2000
Date of birth: 1932
Victims profile: Men, women and children
Method of murder: Poisoning - Fire
Location: Kanungu District, Uganda
Status: On March 17, 2000, Kibweteere apparently died in the groups mass suicide





Too late : MPs start probe into Kibwetere CULT mass killings




Since the emergence of 'rumors' that the Kanungu massacre was orchestrated by the  catholic church to prevent the mass exodus of Catholics to Pentecostal churches,  the catholic connections to the Kanungu cult have been disguised with incredible dexterity. The Government set up a commission of inquiry into the Kanungu inferno, but nothing came out of it because the majority of the people on this commission of inquiry were Catholics (how can a monkey be a judge in a case that involves the forest). The commission concluded that the cult massacre remains a mystery?????? After the massacre, pentecostal churches were accused of being behind the massacre. However the catholic church was greatly embarrassed when it emerged that the ring leaders of this cult were former catholic clergy.

 Kibwetere cult


https://favisonlus.wordpress.com/tag/cult-leaders/


Did Kibwetere die in inferno?

 

Catholic priests and catholic nuns : Kibwetere (second right) and his assistants Ursala Komuhangi, Mwerinde and Fr. Kataribaabo in 1995

newvision

By Patrick Ajuna
Kibwetere, the leader of the Movement for the Restoration of the 10 Commandments and his assistants, are wanted for masterminding the deaths of over 1,000 people. For 13 years now, no one knows whether he is alive or dead
2012_3$largeimg217_Mar_2012_000429523
Thirteen years ago, anticipation of great things to occur in the new millennium. Excitement greeted the dawn of the year 2000.

However, hardly had the celebratory mood cooled down than the world was awoken to the shocking news of a religious mass murder on March 17, 2000, in Kanungu, then within Rukungiri district in western Uganda. About 1,000 people belonging to the Movement for the Restoration of the 10 Commandments of God cult were killed.

New details emerging from the statement given by Kibwetere’s son, Juvenal Rugambwa, to the Police indicate that he identified a burnt body which had a ring like the one his father used to wear and a piece of cassock around the body.
In his statement taken in 2000, Rugambwa also informed the Police that he saw the usual clerical garb and shape of the head which he believed was his father’s.

Police’s view
However, Victor Aisu, an assistant commissioner of Police attached to the Criminal Investigations Department (CID), declined to divulge details of the post-mortem report, saying all bodies were examined at once and that releasing the results could jeopardise investigations. Aisu participated in the preliminary investigations.

SundayVision saw several documents including letters from State House on the matter, but an assistant commissioner of Police only identified as Swaliki, who was responsible for the documents, declined to release any of them.
About 450 people perished in the fire that gutted the cult’s church where people had gathered allegedly to receive the Blessed Virgin Mary and witness the end of the world. The rest of the bodies (550) were found buried in mass graves in different sites where the cult operated.

Initially, it was thought to be mass suicide, but later a commission of inquiry instituted by the Uganda Human Rights Commission (UHRC), established that it was a well planned murder orchestrated by the cult leaders, Credonia Mwerinde, a former prostitute and Joseph Kibwetere, a former teacher and failed politician.
Other cult leaders included Angelina Mugisha, Fr. Joseph Kasapurari and Fr. Dominic Kataribabo.

The 2002 UHRC report on the incident and other media reports trace the origin and background of the cult, how many people died, who killed them, why they were killed, where they were killed, how and where they were buried and  the extent of human rights violations.

Unanswered questions
However, some questions have remained unanswered and no explanation has been given by the concerned authorities 12 years since the incident happened.
The Government’s commission of inquiry report on the incident has never been published and there is no information on the Government’s response to the recommendations of the UHRC report.

The occurrence of this horrific tragedy, which is arguably one of the world’s worst religious mass murders ever recorded, was expected not only to be an eye-opener to the Government and the public, but also help put in place stringent measures to avert future occurrence of crimes of similar nature and magnitude.
In spite of the horrific mass murder, Ugandans have continued to embrace cults like the Faith of Unity in western Uganda under the leadership of Owobusobozi Bisaka.

Owobusobozi Bisaka
Besides Kibwetere, the whereabouts of his co-cult leaders remain unknown, and no further investigations were made despite the UHRC report recommendation to that effect.

Venus Tumuhimbise, the commissioner general crimes at CID, said Police investigations are still ongoing.

“Since the culprits have not yet been arrested and prosecuted, it means investigations have not yet been completed,” he said.
According to the Police report, the cult leaders may have perished with the followers.

The Police report noted that written documents left behind, including a letter to Kibwetere’s wife and records left with Police in Kanungu, encouraged the survivors of the inferno to continue with the religion.

“Documents received, including passports, identity cards and personal belongings indicated that the owners could have died in the inferno,” the Police report pointed out.

The UHRC report says on March 16, 2000, at around midnight, one of the cult followers only identified as Karangwa handed over some sect documents for safe custody to Kanungu Police Post.

There is contradicting information obtained from other sources, however.
According to Innocent Byaruhanga, one of the survivors, Kibwetere left Kanungu two days before the fateful day while other cult leaders left hours to the inferno.
Since Kibwetere has never showed up since the inferno, Tumuhimbise said he is for now regarded as a dead person. Quoting Section 20 of the Estates of the Missing Person’s Act 1973, Tumuhimbise said if a person goes missing for three years, he shall be presumed dead.

Other concerns
UHRC questioned the link between the resident district commissioner of Rukungiri, Kitaka Gawera and the cult leaders.

“The Government should establish the true facts that led to the then RDC (Gawera) to fraternise with the cult leadership in Kanungu to the extent that he laid a foundation stone on one of their buildings.”

However, his predecessor, Yorokamu Kamacerere, in his letter to the NGO registration board and personal briefing to his successor, advised against the registration of the cult.

However, Aisu said RDC Gawera executed his duties. “Police is not aware of allegations that the RDC was cautioned by his predecessor and NGO registration board against the registration of the cult.”

Despite the Kanungu inferno, a number of NGOs, especially those which are faith-based, are not registered and therefore operating illegally. Stephen Okello, the NGO board legal officer said the Police needs to find out which NGOs are operating illegally and prosecute them.

Gilbert Ogutu, a lecturer of religious studies at Nairobi University, cautions: “What happened in Uganda (Kanungu) should be a lesson to developing countries that such cults and sects should be monitored closely by governments so that this disaster does not repeat itself.”

If the concerned authorities do not act very fast to arrest the situation, the occurrence of Kanungu-like incidents would be inevitable.
Preceding events
The followers had been told that the Blessed Virgin Mary would appear to deliver a special message between March 16 and March 18, 2000. Women who had separated from their husbands even went home to persuade those husbands to return to Kanungu to wait for the message.

Followers believed they were going to heaven and they needed to cleanse themselves of whatever sins they had committed on earth. About 60 followers, who had not paid graduated tax, did so on March 14, 2000. l On March 16, 2000 at around midnight, one of the followers, Karangwa, handed over some sect documents (land title, articles of association, constitution and certificate of incorporation) for safe custody to Kanungu Police Post.

The cult leadership seemed to have been preparing for murder. According to Godfrey Bangirana, an assistant commissioner of Police in-charge of serious crime, the cult leadership bought 36 jerrycans of petrol at one of the petrol stations in Kampala on March 9, 2000, yet the cult had no vehicle.

On March 12, 2000, Fr. Kataribabo bought two 20-litre jerrycans of concentrated sulphuric acid from a one Musisi, a proprietor of Musco Agencies in Kasese, supposedly for using in the batteries of the cult vehicles. Pathologists found some traces of petrol and acid at the Kanungu site.

On March 11, 2000, Fr. Kataribabo sold his house and surrounding land to his nephew, where 153 bodies were later found.

Between March 6 and 16, 2000, all the property of the cult was sold at throw-away prices. The cult leaders claimed that they were selling the property to raise money to buy a lorry and a generator.
Fonte: New Vision
http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/640849-did-kibwetere-die-in-inferno.html



Owobusobozi Bisaka: The self-styled god in Bunyoro region

Bisaka seated on his throne. However, not everyone believes in his alleged transcendent powers.
Bisaka seated on his throne. However, not everyone believes in his alleged transcendent powers. The Vicar General of Hoima Catholic Church, Msgr. Mathias Nyakatura, says Bisaka is after self-enrichment.  

By Francis Mugerwa

Posted  Saturday, May 12  2012 at  00:00
 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka, an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, is photographed on his throne at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village
In Summary

One of Ow’obusobozi Bisaka’s religions was banned in the 1980s by government over fears that its practices were dangerous. Twenty-two years later, his fold has continued to grow and now politicians, too, seek his help, Francis Mugerwa writes.


Afew hours’ drive from Kibaale town, on top of Kapyemi Hill stands a white and orange storey building. As one approaches it, the visitor is met by a wooden gate that opens to a lash green compound. To the right are two rows of classroom blocks and to the left a ranch and banana plantation.

 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka, an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, is photographed in his house at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. REUTERS-James Akena
The smell from the ranch pierces your nostrils but is quickly overcome by the sweet scent from the freshly pruned flowers as one approaches the house. A group of people, in tens, seek refuge from the burning sun; some on the verandah and tree shades.

 A follower of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, wearing a pendant with a picture of the cult's founder and 83-year-old self-professed god Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (not pictured), attends a prayer session at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013.  REUTERS-James Akena
 A follower of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, wearing a pendant with a picture of the cult's founder and 83-year-old self-professed god Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (not pictured), attends a prayer session at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013.
REUTERS/James Akena


Welcome to the residence of one of Kibaale’s most powerful and influential characters, Ow’obusobozi Bisaka, a self-professed god. Bisaka does not only run a secondary school at his home but hosts hundreds of visitors daily, who come to seek prophecy, healings and bring various prayer request, some as petty as keeping beauty intact to more serious requests like winning elections for a political office.
 
Guarded residence
The often heavily guarded residence is the headquarters of the Faith of Unity, a sect founded by Bisaka, who lives a reclusive but lavish life. “I have come here to be healed. I have many problems. I have persistent headache, doctors tell me that I require surgery yet I do not have any money” Petero Kiiza,56, a resident of Buhimba Sub-county in Hoima District, says.

 A follower of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, founded by 83-year-old self-professed god Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (not pictured), walk in a queue at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. REUTERS-James Akena
He has travelled about 50 kilometres to meet Bisaka whom he believes can heal him. Kiiza is among the hundreds of people who regularly flock to Kapyemi Hill to seek blessings, healing, jobs and guidance from Bisaka.
 Followers of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, founded by 83-year-old self-professed god Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (C), kneel during a prayer session at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. REUTERS-James Akena

The self- professed god is revered by the young and old and has over the years gained about two million followers across the country and the number is steadily growing. The faith is said to have followers in other countries such as Rwanda, DR Congo and South Sudan.
 
The soft-spoken ecclesiastic also wears the hat of an author, singer and composer, who has various Catholic Church hymns like Nkaikiriza Ruhanga Murungi, which he wrote in 1975 to his credit.
The former Roman Catholic Church follower, who abandoned it in 1980, claims he experienced special powers and heard a loud voice from God that kept directing him to start healing people. “On February, 22, 1980, I accepted and touched a sick person who got healed,” Bisaka says. 

 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka, an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, walks past followers as he arrives to lead a prayer session at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. REUTERS-James Akena
 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka, an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, walks past followers as he arrives to lead a prayer session at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013.
REUTERS/James Akena


This claim, however, cannot be verified but has brought him droves of followers from across the Kigezi and parts of Bunyoro region.

 Followers of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, founded by 83-year-old self-professed god Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (not pictured), walk in a queue at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. REUTERS-James Akena

Followers of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, founded by 83-year-old self-professed god Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (not pictured), walk in a queue at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. 

 The Faith of Unity congregation prays every second, 12th and 22nd day of the month. For the rest of the days, each follower develops a list of good things they hope for daily.

 Followers of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, founded by 83-year-old self-professed god Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka, attend a prayer session at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. REUTERS-James Akena
The group does not believe in the Bible, calling it divisive but use ‘the book of the Faith of Unity’ authored by Bisaka and spells out cleaning courtyards, grazing animals, washing, hunting, donating, smiling at friends and praying to God as deeds that can give one eternal life.
 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (R), an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, walks past his palace which is under construction along with his followers at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. REUTERS-James Akena
 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (R), an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, walks past his palace which is under construction along with his followers at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013.
REUTERS/James Akena
The Faith of Unity denies Jesus’ existence. “The Bible is a source of disunity,” he says, “Whoever wants to start a religion picks a few verses to justify starting a new religion.” 
 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (R), an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, select followers who have repented before allowing them into the worship hall at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. Owobusobozi Bisaka claims to have supernatural powers to heal all kind of illnesses and says he is able to unite people from around the world. He has some 2 million followers in the Great Lakes region of east Africa, a cult member said. REUTERS-James Akena
 Omukama Ruhanga Owobusobozi Bisaka (R), an 83-year-old self-professed god and founder of the Ugandan cult group Faith of Unity, select followers who have repented before allowing them into the worship hall at the cult's headquarters in Kapyemi village in Muhoro town council, 251 km (156 miles) west of the Uganda capital, October 12, 2013. 


Owobusobozi Bisaka claims to have supernatural powers to heal all kind of illnesses and says he is able to unite people from around the world. He has some 2 million followers in the Great Lakes region of east Africa, a cult member said.

The former teacher of the Bible wonders why the Holy book was not signed by the author, God. He, however, teaches that God is in three parts- God the creator, God of Holiness and himself Owobusobozi Bisaka. But his followers are so bent on believing in his powers. “He has spiritual powers which he uses to bless and heal us,” Omuhereza Baguma, a former Kibaale district LC5 aspirant, who joined the faith in 1985, says.
Bisaka claims that he was crowned by God with a throne which is a white as snow to fight Satan.
Born to Petero and Ms Byombi 82 years ago, in Buyanja County, Kibaale District, he grew up under the care of his grandparents, Alifonsio Wenkere and Malita Nyakake, who were catechists.
Bisaka served as a catechist at Bujuni Parish. In his biography published in 1987, he served as a teacher at Muhorro Primary School and choirmaster in Muhorro Catholic Church. He also served as secretary and chairman of the Muhorro Parish council.




Church’s take

However, not everyone believes in Bisaka’s alleged transcendent powers. The Vicar General of Hoima Catholic Church, Msgr. Mathias Nyakatura, says Bisaka is after self-enrichment. “He wanted money because he was not being paid well. He tricks people to get money but we pray for him and his followers to repent,” Msgr. Nyakatura says.


The Catholic Church has since banned his songs. Bisaka followers, however, think otherwise. “He has powers to see the good and bad person. Before a person joins this faith, they required to list all their sins which he wants Owobusobozi to cleanse,” Omukwenda Kusemererwa, one of the right-hand men, claims.
“If a person has forgotten, Owobusobozi is able to remind them some of the sins.”


He harvests rain water, blesses it and gives it to his followers who often drink it, arguing that they get healing from it. His followers do not enter the worship places with shoes. They wear white tunics (kanzu) to symbolise their holiness.

Political influence
If one is not his followers, then one is sure to feel Bisaka’s power and influence in politics. To show how much influence he has got, President Museveni ensures he attends his birthday every June 11 or at least have a senior minister represent him.


Several of his followers hold political positions in Bunyoro region or just pay allegiance to him. It is common for key political leaders to pay him visits and openly source for his support during political campaigns.

The leaders across the political divide from village level to higher political offices closely associate with him. Robinah Nabanja, the Kibaale Woman MP, attests to his powers, saying: “People of all religious denominations including his followers supported me. I am pleased with his work.” “I personally know people who used to be drunkards but when they joined the Faith of Unity, they got transformed,” Ms Nabanja adds.

Medard Ahumuza, the Muhooro sub-county representative to the Kibaale District council, says: “He encourages his people to vote leaders who will promote unity and I often join his followers for prayers just like I join churches and mosques.” He added that it is common for candidates to canvass support by claiming that Owobusobozi has endorsed their candidature.”

Minister for Investments Aston Kajara ( Mwenge South MP) confesses to having a close relationship with Bisaka. “At a personal level, he is my friend.”

The Kibaale FDC chairman, Omuhereza Ayebale Kanyarutooke, and the Kibaale NRM chairman, Omuhereza Mulumba, are also followers of the Faith of Unity.

Several incumbents and aspirants of parliamentary, LC5 and sub-county leadership positions in Kyenjojo, Kibaale and Hoima districts attend Bisaka’s functions and are usually at the forefront of giving offertory. “He has a lot of influence here because his followers consult him before making key decisions,” Omuhereza Baguma says.

Politicians like President Museveni praises Bisaka for promoting unity, development using “little African resources and doesn’t rely on foreign aid”.

However, not all is easy walk for his followers, as witnessed by his confidant Omuhereza Baguma who lost to the incumbent Mr George Namyaka. The self-professed god also finds his strength in the fact that politics in the region is played along religious lines.





ALSO SEE,


Sserulanda/ Ssessamirembe cult exposed





HAPPY SCIENCE CULT TAKES ROOT IN UGANDA: THE LEADERSHIP OF WATOTO CHURCH WARNS UGANDANS ABOUT RYUHO OKAWA SATURDAY 23-6-12 LECTURE



CULT WITH IN A CULT: THE CATHOLIC CHURCH CULT IN UGANDA PANICS AS SUB-CULTS INCREASE WITH IN IT







Ridiculous !!! Ugandan Clerics call for the limitation of freedom of worship in the wake of the Happy Science cult







Born again Catholics!!!!!!: Exposing JB Mukajanja’s Fire ministry








Cult Watch Uganda : New religion discourages use of cellphones