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Tuesday, 18 February 2014

Uganda’s sickening bottomless pit of hypocrisy: The bogus law that will just remain on the shelf : Uganda bans miniskirts, pornography: Tough penalties loom as Museveni signs Anti-Pornography Bill into law

Ethics minister Simon Lokodo addressing journalists in Kampala yesterday.

Ethics minister Simon Lokodo addressing journalists in Kampala yesterday. Fr Lokodo said the President assented to the Bill on February 6. PHOTO BY RACHEL AJWANG


My Comment

This bogus law will remain on the books just like the Enguli act. It is surprising that even those advocating for this law have children, cousins, mothers , sisters , wives and friends who dress skimpy but they do not want the law to touch their own. Aren’t there better things to do? We have failed to curb corruption and we think we will impress the world by incarcerating skimpy dressed ladies. What an amazing hypocrisy!!!

This is real talibanisation of Uganda.  This law  will be impossible to enforce with out serious repercussions. Will they round up all the miniskirted university girls, female MPs, girls in pastor kayanja’s church, wives of Male MPs, University professors etc etc? More so, Is Museveni so naïve to risk losing all the marks he has scored internationally on the gender empowerment in Uganda. They are more burning issues to handle than incarcerating skimpy dressed ladies

Must Read:


Talibanising Uganda !!! Government tables Bill to outlaw miniskirts





Hypocrisy of Uganda’s Minister of Ethics and Integrity- Catholic Priest Fr. Simon Lokodo: Ugandan Women free to wear miniskirts - Lokodo

http://watchmanafrica.blogspot.com/2014/01/hypocrisy-of-ugandas-minister-of-ethics.html

Tough penalties loom as Museveni signs Anti-Pornography Bill into law




 
By Emmanuel Mulondo & Marvin Kirunda

Posted  Wednesday, February 19  2014 at  08:00
In Summary
Tough penalties. The new law spells out tough measures against promoters of ponographic content.

Promoters of pornographic material could soon be in trouble after the President signed the Anti-Pornography Bill, 2011 into law. Publishers, broadcasters, film importers and exporters, artists, bar owners and internet café operators are the likely culprits.

Ethics minister Simon Lokodo announced the President’s assent to the Bill at the government Media Centre yesterday.
The announcement came on the heels of Mr Museveni’s indication at the weekend that he would soon sign the anti-gays Bill into law, provoking a backlash from the West where US President Barack Obama called the legislation an “affront to human rights” with potential to “complicate our valued relationship with Uganda.”
Fr Lokodo said pornography had pervaded the Ugandan society, becoming an insidious social problem that had eaten society to the “marrow.” He said children had become innocent victims. Other costs of the vice, he said, included the rise in HIV/Aids infections, murders, teenage pregnancies and school drop-outs.
Section Two of the law defines pornography as “any representation through publication, exhibition, cinematography, indecent show, information technology, or by whatever means of a person engaged in real or stimulated explicit sexual activities or any representation of sexual parts of a person for primary sexual excitement.”
Under this definition, people who skimpily dress may fall prey to the legislation. “If your miniskirt falls within the ambit of this definition then I am afraid you will be caught up by the law,” the minister said.

Mini or Maxi: Young Ugandan woman at the Uganda HiPipo awards 2014

Uganda bans miniskirts, pornography
Publish Date: Feb 18, 2014
Uganda bans miniskirts, pornography

Minister Simon Lokodo: "We do not like you to behave in a way that draws the attention of other people." PHOTO/Nicholas Kajoba

By Francis Kagolo & Priscillar Alinda              

KAMPALA - President Yoweri Museveni has signed a law which criminalizes indecency and promotion of pornography.

Henceforth, women have been forbidden from wearing clothes like miniskirts and cleavage-revealing blouses ('tops') that excite sexual cravings in public, unless for educational and medical purposes or during sports or cultural events.

Addressing the press at the Media Centre in Kampala on Tuesday, ethics and integrity state minister, Rev. Fr. Simon Lokodo said the President signed the bill into law on February 6, two months after its passing by the House.

Parliament passed the piece of legislation December last year.
The law creates a national anti-pornography committee responsible for its implementation by ensuring early detection, collection and destroying of pornographic materials.

The committee, whose representatives will be drawn from various sectors including the media and entertainment industries, will also offer rehabilitation services to victims of pornography.

The anti-pornography law has repealed and replaced Section 166 of the Penal Code Act, widening the legal interpretation of pornography and prohibiting it comprehensively.

'Be decent'

According to the law, pornography means “any representation through publication, exhibition, cinematography, indecent show, information technology or by whatever means, of a person engaged in real or stimulated explicit sexual activities or any representation of the sexual parts of a person for primary sexual excitement.”

Minister Lokodo also identified sex tease shows commonly known as bimansulo, videos or photos depicting child sex, and musicians, especially female artistes, who perform in very revealing short dresses, as the other banned acts.

“We do not like you to behave in a way that draws the attention of other people. Be decent and let your cloth show you as a decent person,” Lokodo said.

Asked to draw precise indecency lines, the minister said: “If you are dressed in something that irritates the mind and excites other people especially of the opposite sex, you are dressed in wrong attire and please hurry up and change”.

Media houses are also banned from publishing pictures of couples kissing or indecently-dressed women like those taken in night clubs, according to Patricia Achan-Okiria, the principal legal officer in the ethics ministry.

The minister described concerns from development partners over the anti-pornography bill as mere blackmail that won’t derail his office from fighting moral degeneration.
The Anti-Pornography Act 2014 courtesy of http://parliamentwatchuganda.org/